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Tuesday, 14 November 2017

Pulp AdventureCon 2018 - photos



The door to paper treasures
The door to paper treasures

The dealer's room
The dealer's room

Dealer with his collection
Dealer with his collection
Some more magazines
Some more magazines



Adventure House's wall of pulp
Adventure House's wall of pulp
Some detective and mystery pulps
Some detective and mystery pulps



Art from science fiction digests
Art from science fiction digests

Stag magazine cover
Stag magazine cover

Ken for Men magazine cover
Ken for Men magazine cover


More art
More art

Frank R. Paul interior illustrations for Famous Fantastic Mysteries
Frank R. Paul interior illustrations for Famous Fantastic Mysteries


Cover for Talbot Mundy paperback "The Devil's Guard"
Cover for Talbot Mundy paperback "The Devil's Guard"

Virgil Finlay interior illustration
Virgil Finlay interior illustration


Roy Krenkel print of Red Sonja
Roy Krenkel print of Red Sonja

Couple of pulp collectors having a "friendly" discussion
Couple of pulp collectors having a "friendly" discussion

My find - Adventure #1, November 1910. Not in great shape, very hard to find in any condition.
My find - Adventure #1, November 1910. Not in great shape, very hard to find in any condition.

Monday, 13 November 2017

Review: Art of the pulps


Beautiful art - a retro blast from the past



This book takes readers back to an era without television or radio, when magazine covers featured original art designed to lure readers into picking up and buying them. From the early 1900s to the early 1950s, pulp magazines were the popular entertainment media of choice for millions of readers across the English speaking world.They were published in America and to a lesser extent, in Canada and the United Kingdom and read across the world, reaching as far as Australia and South Africa. Some were even translated into French and Spanish.

The pulp magazines were the medium through which a variety of genres established themselves - science fiction, fantasy and hardboiled detective among them. They brought a range of authors and memorable characters from Edgar Rice Burroughs (Tarzan), Johnston McCulley (Zorro), Lester Dent (Doc Savage), H. P. Lovecraft (Cthulu), Robert E. Howard (Conan, Solomon Kane, Kull) and Dashiell Hammett (The Continental Op, Sam Spade) to readers. And they sold this with covers that made you want to pick them up, and interior illustrations that drew the reader deeper into the stories, till you bought and took them home.

This book surveys the pulp magazine field, taking us on a journey from the early days of the field in the 1900s when there a few general fiction magazines, to the end in the 1950s, when paperbacks and television replaced the pulps. All the major genres - adventure, detective/mystery, westerns, aviation, sports, love/romance, horror, science fiction, hero pulps (predecessors of the comics) and spicys - are covered. It's rounded off with a couple of essays on two great artists and authors. Each section's essay comes from an expert in the field, and all are published writers, so they know how to tell the tale. 

But you're not buying this book for the essays - excellent though they are - the art is the reason to buy this book.The book is printed on glossy paper, and the scans are from original issues in the personal collections of the authors. Each chapter is about 20% text and 80% art; with 12 chapters and about 240 pages it's almost 200 pages of gorgeous art for your money. A few sample pages below (some pages are cropped because my scanner isn't big enough):

Adventure

Aviation

Mystery/Detective

Hero

Horror

Romance

Science Fiction/Fantasy

Spicy

Sports

Weird Menace
Western


If you like illustration art, you have to pick this up. Link here: http://amzn.to/2iSHMjy 


Saturday, 30 September 2017

On the occasion of the 136th birthday of Donald A. Kennicott, the long-time editor of Blue Book magazine, I'm happy to present to you this article written by him in the November 1954 issue of Blue  Book magazine, 2 years after he had stopped editing the magazine. It's a great companion to Mike Ashley's article about Blue Book which covers the magazine during Kennicott's tenure.



ADVENTURES IN EDITING
DONALD A. KENNICOTT

The gentleman and scholar who was a Bluebook editor during 42 of this magazine's 50 years looks back on an exciting and distinguished career.



First issue of the magazine that became Blue Book
First issue of the magazine that became Blue Book


After a long experience in magazine editing, Burgess Johnson wrote an autobiography which he called “As Much as I Dare, ” taking his title from Montaigne: “I speak the truth, not so much as I would, but as much as I dare; and I dare a little more as I grow older. ” Ellery Sedgwick, recalling his 30 years of “adventuring in human nature” as editor of the Atlantic, chose “The Happy Profession” as the title for a memoir of those years. After my 42 years with Bluebook, I am inclined to think that Burgess Johnson chose the better title.

Saturday, 9 September 2017

Jay Paul Jackson - Artist (1905-1954)

Jay Jackson was the name he gave as an artist for the pulp magazines in Chicago. I came across his work when i was reading an issue of Golden Fleece magazine which had illustrations by him. Not finding much about him on the web, I did a little research and found this article on him which I thought was worth sharing for the picture it painted of a struggling African American artist in the days of the Great Depression.

Cover for Golden Fleece, December 1938 jointly credited to Jay Jackson and Harold S. DeLay
Cover for Golden Fleece, December 1938 jointly credited to Jay Jackson and Harold S. DeLay
(Image courtesy the FictionMags Index)

This autobiographical article appeared in the October 1941 issue of Fantastic Adventures. The only other article about him that i could find on the web was this one: https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/40444

Jay Paul Jackson aka Jay Jackson (1905-1954)
Jay Paul Jackson aka Jay Jackson (1905-1954)

Saturday, 26 August 2017

Charles Richard Beeler aka Caddo Cameron - Cowboy, Railroader, Author

Charles Richard Beeler wrote under the pen name Caddo Cameron. He had many novels starring a pair of Texas Rangers – Blizzard Wilson and Badger Coe - in Short Stories, all of which were later issued in hardcovers. This was in addition to a series of stories about a pair of troublesome Texas twins – Paint and Pinto Hawkins. All worth reading, for he was one of those men who had witnessed the settlement of the American West, and could write with earthy humor about it.

Charles Richard Beeler aka Caddo Cameron (1881-19??)
Charles Richard Beeler aka Caddo Cameron (1881-19??)